You are not alone if you are a CKD patient suffering from Gout

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Have you ever been awaken to the sensation that your big toe is on fire? If you answered yes, then you might have been attacked by Gout. Gout is a complex form of arthritis, and characterized by sudden, severe attacks of pain, redness and tenderness in joints, often the joint at the base of the big toe. The affected area may be so tender that the weight of the sheet on it may seem intolerable.

About 30% of individuals with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) suffer from gout, and gout is approximately threefold higher in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) than the earlier stages of Kidney Disease. Fortunately, gout is treatable, and there are ways to reduce the risk that gout will recur.

Treatment for gout usually involves medications. Those medications that you and your healthcare team choose will be based on your current health and your own preferences. Gout medications can be used to treat acute attacks and prevent future attacks as well as reduce your risk of complications from gout, such as the development of a hard deposit of crystalline uric acid and its salts in cartilage or joints; also known as tophi.

Although medications are the most proven, effective way to treat gout symptoms, making certain changes to your diet may also help. For instance, avoiding alcohol, eating a moderate amount of protein (preferably from healthy sources, such as low-fat or fat-free dairy, tofu, and eggs), and limiting your daily intake of meat, fish and poultry to 4 to 6 ounces should minimize the risk of future attacks.

There are other complementary treatments which may help you cope with your gout pain until your medications take effect. Examples would be various relaxation techniques such as, deep-breathing, exercises, and meditation.

In summary, KidneyBuzz.com would like to draw your attention a couple of important points. First, there is a high prevalence of gout among persons with CKD. Also, albuminuria (presence of albumin in the urine) is associated with a higher prevalence of gout so you should attempt to limit your protein intake within the parameters of your treatment plan.

References:

Staff, Mayo Clinic. "Definition." Mayo Clinic. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research

"Strong Relationship Between Chronic Kidney Disease and Gout Confirmed" Pain Medicine News

 

 

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