Google's New Technology Set To Assist CKD and Diabetic Patients To Greatly Improve Quality of Life

KidneyBuzz.com finds it to be breaking news when the technology giant, Google announced Tuesday July 16th, 2014, that they have developed a first-of-its-kind smart contact lens with the potential to monitor the wearer’s blood sugar levels.  

Recommended Reading: Non-Diabetic CKD Are Having Serious Blood Sugar Complications. How To Better Manage Blood Sugar.

Most people know that Diabetic patients in general must monitor their Blood Sugar to avoid accidents, injuries, coma, and even death. However even if you do not have Diabetes, did you know that you could be suffering with Blood Sugar that is out of balance? Especially true for Chronic Kidney Disease patients who already have an elevated risk of Diabetes, physical stress, emotional stress (both positive and negative), infections, Beta Blockers (heart disease medication), and antidepressants can all cause drastic changes in your Blood Sugar.

Recommended Reading: Low Blood Sugar Is Affecting An Unexpected Portion Of CKD Patient Population And Becoming Serious

The smart lens prototype was released in January. With this smart lens technology, information about your Blood Sugar Levels could be uploaded to your cell (smart) phone device and used by your Healthcare Team to track dangerous shifts as well as used by you directly to monitor your Blood Sugar in real time; according to a statement issued by Google. Sergey Brin, a Google founder, said the company’s smart lens technology could “help improve the quality of life for millions of people.”

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Shifts in your Blood Sugar can create serious challenges which may affect your quality of life. High Blood Sugar (Hypoglycemia) may cause nausea, vomiting, and blurry vision, abdominal pain, weakness, confusion, and even unconsciousness. On the other hand, Low Blood Sugar (Hypoglycemia) has been known to lead to hunger, fatigue, sweating, headaches, shakiness, dizziness, weakness, confusion, difficulty coordinating movement, anxiety, problems with vision, upset stomach and trouble speaking. The Medical Journal, Science Daily notes that, "findings indicate that Hypoglycemia may account for some portion of the excess heart-related deaths seen in Chronic Kidney Disease patients."

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Clearly, this technology could greatly help those in the Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetes communities because it is vital for people in these populations to be aware of Blood Sugar fluctuations so that they can prevent them by taking the appropriate action before things become serious. 

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Visit KidneyBuzz.com every day for updates about the smart lens and other groundbreaking technology that is set to greatly improve the lives of Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patients. Also visit KidneyBuzz.com for Breaking News and Information which help Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patients better manage their lives. 

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References:

"Novartis Joins With Google to Develop Contact Lens That Monitors Blood Sugar." Http://www.nytimes.com/. International Business Times.

"Low Blood Sugar: Killer For Kidney Disease Patients?" Http://www.sciencedaily.com. ScienceDaily.

"Hypoglycemia Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment." Http://www.webmd.com. WebMD.

"Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Glucose)." Http://www.diabetes.org. American Diabetes Association.

"Novartis Joins With Google to Develop Contact Lens That Monitors Blood Sugar." Http://www.nytimes.com/. International Business Times.

"Low Blood Sugar: Killer For Kidney Disease Patients?" Http://www.sciencedaily.com. ScienceDaily.

"Hypoglycemia Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment." Http://www.webmd.com. WebMD.

"Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Glucose)." Http://www.diabetes.org. American Diabetes Association.