Help Kenneth Litchfield Find A Matching Kidney Donor

Background:

Dear Donor,

It’s very good to see you here at my Find A Kidney Donor Campaign. Your visit is exactly the medicine I need to stave off depression and hopelessness; both conditions are often experienced by people suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD)/kidney failure. It comes about because we know the fragility of our lives every time we conduct dialysis. I have been on dialysis for 18 months and unfortunately my health is beginning to fail. The actual problem emanates from an underlying disease called Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) which I was diagnosed with years ago and had to take anti-inflammatory medicine that may have contributed to my complete kidney failure. Like dialysis, sometimes the treatment is as bad as the disease. Dialysis is meant to be a temporary modality designed to use until a compatible donor is found, but it can cause substantial problems in the long run. That’s why folks want to receive a transplant so much. It’s why I personally began this campaign in order to find you. It is true that I am suffering physically. If I thought about it in a philosophical way, I would probably believe that life is a series of suffering interspaced with joy and memories of good times. My son is a big joyful memory to my wife and I. We miss him very much. He was our only child and he left us way too soon. His passing taught me the value of living and I won’t give up trying to stay alive under any circumstances. I want you to please help me. Please be my life saving donor. You may be concerned about cost, safety, longevity or a number of other things, I will be glad to discuss them all with you if you leave your name and a message below where I can reach you.

I have an urgency in wanting to receive a transplant so I ask you to please ponder whether or not you will help me, think it over, but I ask that you not stay away too long. Time is of the essence. Although I am registered as needing a kidney transplant on the transplant list I have discovered that there are approximately 100,000 other people also waiting. More than a few have actually died while waiting for their donor. I don’t want to be another statistic of that sort. The transplant procedure is deemed medically safe, the recovery time is brief and human beings can live their life span with just one healthy kidney. I ask you to please help me by giving me the gift of life and allowing me to begin a new life free from dialysis. Please won’t you help me?

Sincerely Yours,

Kenneth Litchfield

Click here to join Kenneth's Facebook Campaign search!

A Note From Kenneth:

Hello,

Thank you for expressing interest and showing your support of my need for a living kidney donor. 

I would like you to know that the process of living kidney donation is safe, and if you or someone you know would like to donate, then please send me a message (below). Thanks again!

Regards,

Ken

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Hear From An Expert:


Video Testimonial:

Laureen Gerzack is an example of the highly specialized, complicated cases typically seen and treated at Mount Sinai. Over the years, Laureen's kidneys had been badly damaged by diabetes. It came to a point where complications caused by diabetes prevented Laureen from having life-saving dialysis. She needed a kidney transplant or she would die.

 

Written Testimonial From, Patricia Comito -  Living Kidney Donor:

"Ok, here's my story. Feel free to share. My sister died of breast cancer. There was nothing anyone could do to help her. It was a blow to my life and my heart. I decided that I would never sit and watch another person die if I could help it. 4 years later, my friend had to make a choice of dialysis or death. I said no, I would donate. The donor only needs to notify a nephrologist (kidney specialist) that they want to donate, and the testing begins. Blood tests, ultrasounds, even a psychological exam. Not everyone passes these tests. It could be something as simple as gestational diabetes, or melanoma, that will keep you from being a donor. 

Once you are cleared the search begins. They match genetics, etc... (Very complicated) blood tests continue on a quarterly basis. If you have a cold, your situation could change and you will need to be cleared again. So, after 6 very long months, my recipient was found. Then the friend of mine had to be matched. A recipient for me was found and then got very sick so he was dropped down the list. 2 months later another recipient was found. Surgery was scheduled. My friend received his kidney and 5 days later I went through surgery. My kidney went to someone in Las Vegas. The surgery is done through a scope so there is only one bigger scar and 3 small holes. The bigger scar is below the navel and is where they bring the kidney through. They always take the Left kidney because it has a longer tube. 

Recovery was not so bad, although very uncomfortable for about 4 days. I was back at work within a month. Today I am 6 1/2 years since surgery. My body cannot even tell I had surgery and I'm as healthy as ever. The only thing that is different is that my creatinine is a little high. It always will be but the one kidney that I have has grown in size to help take over for the one gone. I cannot take ibuprofen unless I absolutely have to, otherwise, everything is great. To be called a hero, or an "exceptional human being" is really nice, but really I'm just another person that was willing to help someone in need. My recipient is still going like crazy. Was told by his doctor (Dr. Veale) he would never die from his kidney. They had a perfect match. 

Every once in a while I look at my scar and question myself if I could would I do it again.....and my answer is always yes. That's the biggest thing, you have to have a positive attitude. A wanting to help. And never a moment of questioning. Not everyone can do it. But it's soooo easy, everyone should! And.....Dr. Veale is fantastic, so is the team at UCLA."


Frequently Asked Questions:

Who can be a donor?

To qualify as a living donor, an individual must be in good health, free from any serious medical problems and between the ages of 21 and 60.

What are the risks involved?

Donating a kidney does not have any long-term effect on health. Donors may experience a slight rise in blood pressure and a small amount of excess protein in the urine following surgery. There is no greater risk of developing kidney failure after donating at kidney than anyone in the general population.

Are there activities that I will not be able to do in the future if I choose to donate a kidney?

In general, donating a kidney does not have any long-term effect on health. Some restrictions do apply following donor surgery, including reducing or eliminating the use of NSAIDS and avoiding any activity that may cause injury to the surgical area.

Who makes the final decision on potential donors?

Based on the evaluation results, the Transplant team (comprised of nephrologists, nurses, social workers, dieticians and other transplant specialists) decides whether or not to proceed with a living donor kidney transplant as the best therapeutic option.

Who pays for the donor's medical expenses?

The recipient's insurance covers all of the donor's evaluation and hospitalization costs; however, it does not cover lost income, transportation costs or personal expenses. The transplant financial advisor reviews the potential donor/recipient procedures and associated costs carefully prior to the evaluation.

How long will I be in the hospital?

Most donors remain in the hospital for two to three days.

What is the recovery process like?

Most kidney donors resume normal activities four to six weeks after surgery. Donors are not able to drive for three to four weeks after discharge and are not permitted to lift heavy objects. You may need assistance with daily living activities during this time.

How long will I be out of work?

Depending on the nature of the work, donors typically return to work between 10 days and two weeks.

What happens if I decide not to become a living liver donor?

At any point, for any reason, the evaluation process can be stopped. The recipient will remain active on the transplant list and is free to find another potential living donor.


Shocking Stats:

Chief Medical Officer (United Network for Organ Sharing) Dr. David Klassen (Nephrologist) said in a Huffington Post article, "I’ve also witnessed the results of the severe organ shortage in this country. Too often I’ve lost patients because the organ they needed did not come in time. Too many lives cut short. Too many dreams unlived." The following are a few very sobering stats which Chronic Kidney Disease and Dialysis patients should share as well as their loved ones:

90,000 - The number of Dialysis patients that die every year according to Renal and Urology News. 

121,076 - The number of people currently waiting for a lifesaving organ in the United States, as reported by the United Network for Organ Sharing. 

100,269 - The number of patients awaiting a Kidney Transplant specifically. This suggests that approximately 80.9% of the entire organ transplant waiting list is made of individuals in need of a kidney. It is important to note that living kidney donation is very safe and if found to be a match, a donor would undergo a rigorous health evaluation before donating to ensure good long-term health outcomes.

22 - The number of people who die every single day, waiting for a transplant.

4,500 - The number of Chronic Kidney Disease patients that die every year waiting for a kidney transplant, as noted by the Living Kidney Donor Network.

6 - The number of people added to the transplant wait list every hour, reported by Huffington Post.

0 (zero) - The number of major religions that are against their members donating an organ. All major organized religions in the United States are favorable of organ and tissue donation and most likely consider it an act of charity.


Take A Moment To Learn What A Difference You Could Make:

The Need For Living Kidney Donors

“There are about 90,000 people waiting for kidney transplants in the United States,” says Dr. Gibney. “There are about 14,000 kidney transplants a year. Each year, more people are in need of organs and get added to that list.

So that’s one of the things that makes living donation so important is that there’s a fairly limited supply of organs. If there are friends or family members who can give, that can save lives and really extend people’s lives by years and years.”


 

Media:

If you would like to share Kenneth's story via your publication, then please send a direct message below.

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