Ways to Manage Fluid Gain, and Live Longer

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Too much fluid is bad for your blood pressure and heart, and it causes swelling.  Therefore, thirst control is essential to healthy living, especially with Kidney Disease.  The following techniques will help you control the urge to take in excessive fluids:

USE SMALL CONTAINERS FOR DRINKING

If you use small containers, you tend to drink less than if you were to use larger ones.  Should you decide to use a larger container, try to not fill it up.

LIMIT THE SALT YOU USE

The less salt you use, the less thirsty you feel.  Also, salt tends to cause your body to retain water.

A LITTLE CANDY KEEPS THE THIRST AWAY

Candy, such as mints, does a  great job of fighting thirst.  Always keep a supply of mints or other hard candy with you.

EXCHANGE SIPS FOR GULPS

Even when you are really thirsty, try to sip your drink and enjoy the taste, rather than focus on quenching your thirst as fast as possible.

DELIBERATELY DIVIDE YOUR DAILY FLUID INTAKE

Take your total daily intake of fluid and divide it into equal parts for your whole day.  For example, if you and your healthcare team were to decide that you should have a maximum of 32 ounces/day.  Then you could divide up your awake hours as follows:

6am  - 10am.     8 ounces

10am  -  2pm.    8 ounces

 2pm -   6pm.     8 ounces

 6pm -  10pm.    8 ounces

A schedule such as this should assist you in monitoring how much you drink through out the day.

PLAN YOUR SOCIAL EVENTS

For example, if you know you are likely to be socializing in the evening, decrease your fluid intake earlier in the day to make sure you stick to your fluid intake daily objective.

KEEP YOUR BREATH FRESH

Keeping your breath fresh with gum, a good mouth wash, and brushing your tongue; not only is good hygiene but also is effective for thirst control.

These tips are easy to apply in your day to day living, and will yield great results in controlling your fluid intake.  Try them! You will like them!

Part taken from National Kidney, Spring Issue 2013 (Pg. 7).